PRs are one of the most cost effective marketing tools online! Signup Today!

Posts made in February, 2015

Leonard Nimoy, a pop culture force as Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83

By on Feb 28, 2015 in Press Release | 0 comments

“Someday,” producer Gene Roddenberry said many decades ago, “I’m going to make a science-fiction series and put pointed ears on that guy.” The series was “Star Trek,” and the guy was Leonard Nimoy, who died Feb. 27 at 83. A tall, taut-faced actor, he had been laboring in obscurity for 15 years before Roddenberry hired him in 1966 to play the half-human, half-alien space explorer Spock. Those pointy ears — along with the upswept eyebrows and “five-point” Vidal Sassoon bob — brought Mr. Nimoy enduring stardom in an entertainment and merchandising empire equaled perhaps only by the James Bond, “Star Wars” and “Harry Potter” franchises. “Star Trek,” a drama about the adventures of the starship Enterprise as it explored “the final frontier” of space, was not a critical or popular hit during its initial run on NBC from 1966 to 1969. In syndication, however, it became a phenomenon. DeForest Kelley, left, Leonard Nimoy, second left, Nichelle Nichols, second right and William Shatner, right, appear in a scene from the TV series “Star Trek.” (Anonymous/AP) [Leonard Nimoy’s final public words: ‘Live long and prosper’] Communities of fans known as “Trekkies” burst forth in the 1970s, creating richly imagined fantasy worlds that were based on the show and that were played out at large-scale conventions. Filmmaker George Lucas said “Star Trek” helped pave the way for his “Star Wars” movies. The success of “Star Wars,” in turn, helped spur the “Star Trek” film series. As a television program, “Star Trek” proved groundbreaking in many ways. It served up allegorical tales about violence, greed, jealousy, prejudice, peace and love — the roiling social issues of the 1960s — in the guise of intergalactic adventure. It did so, said television scholar Robert Thompson, “at a time when American television completely shied away from any kind of relevance or social controversy, except in the news.” Its 23rd-century starship crew was a utopian federation of men and women, blacks and whites, Americans, Russians and Asians — and Spock, who was born on the planet Vulcan in a civilization that has mastered control of its feelings. (The Vulcan aphorism “live long and prosper” became a catchphrase.) He becomes the science officer and first mate aboard the...

Read More

Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, dead at 83

By on Feb 27, 2015 in Press Release | 0 comments

(CNN)Leonard Nimoy, whose portrayal of “Star Trek’s” logic-driven, half-human science officer Spock made him an iconic figure to generations, died Friday. He was 83. The Los Angeles Times and New York Times confirmed his death with his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy. The cause of death was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, she told the New York Times. Nimoy’s career in show business spanned more than six decades and included stints as a stage actor, television guest star, series regular and movie veteran. He also directed a handful of films, including the box-office hit “Three Men and a Baby” in 1987. He was a singer (of sorts), a published poet and an accomplished photographer. But his lasting claim to fame remains Spock, a native of the planet Vulcan whose pointed ears, unemotional manner and frequently uttered “fascinating” endeared him to millions. He felt a close connection to the character. “Spock is definitely one of my best friends. When I put on those ears, it’s not like just another day. When I become Spock, that day becomes something special,” he told Starlog in 1989. Still, as an actor, he wrestled with the typecasting that came with his close association with Spock. He titled a 1975 memoir “I Am Not Spock.” Though the book was less a rejection of the character than what he went through to develop him, fans took umbrage. Twenty years later, he called another memoir “I Am Spock.” He maintained a sense of humor about being confused with a 23rd-century space voyager. “I had an embarrassing experience once, many years ago,” he told The New York Times in 2009. “I was invited to go to Caltech and was introduced to a number of very brilliant young people who were working on interesting projects. … And they’d say to me, ‘What do you think?’ Expecting me to have some very sound advice. And I would nod very quietly and very sagely I would say, ‘You’re on the right track.’ ” To the stars Leonard Simon Nimoy was actually born in Boston, far from Vulcan, on March 26, 1931. (His longtime “Trek” colleague, William Shatner, was born four days earlier in Montreal.) His parents were Russian immigrants, and he was raised...

Read More

Mo. gunman kills 7 people in 4-home shooting spree: sheriff

By on Feb 27, 2015 in Press Release | 0 comments

Doug Davison/Houston HeraldNine people died at multiple scenes in south central Missouri overnight, deputies said. Doug Davison/Houston HeraldPolice have released few details about the killings. Doug Davison/Houston HeraldTexas County Sheriff James Sigman (r.) works in a mobile command post as deputies investigate multiple deaths across several crime scenes. Enlarge A Missouri gunman killed seven people inside four homes across a rural community late Thursday before he turned the gun on himself, officials said. The shooting spree started around 10:15 p.m. when the 36-year-old gunman shot two people inside a Tyrone home, Texas County Sheriff James Sigman told the Houston Herald. A scared girl inside the house called 911 when she heard gunshots, but she was not hurt, investigators said. The gunmen then went to three more homes in Tyrone, a rural community in south central Missouri, where he killed five more people, officers said at a Friday press conference. One more person in one of the homes was injured during the rampage, deputies said. New York Daily News Photo Illustration The incidents took place in  Texas County, Mo. The shooter then drove to neighboring Shannon County and shot and killed himself inside of his car, deputies said. While investigators searched Tyrone homes overnight, they found elderly woman who died from natural causes in a fifth home. Investigators are not calling her a victim. Investigators said at least some of the victims knew the gunman, but further details were not available. Police have not released any names or a possible motive. This is a developing story. Check back for updates. ON A MOBILE DEVICE? WATCH THE VIDEO...

Read More

‘Locked and Loaded’: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

By on Feb 26, 2015 in Press Release | 0 comments

The Federal Communications Commission is driving toward a landmark vote Thursday on a sweeping plan that critics warn would impose a new era of regulation for how Americans use and do business on the Internet, even as eleventh-hour appeals inject added drama behind the scenes.  The so-called net neutrality proposal has been the subject of fierce debate, in part because the 332-page plan is being kept from public eyes. President Obama’s vocal push for aggressive Internet rules also has raised questions on Capitol Hill over undue influence by the White House — but House Republicans who had planned a hearing on that very subject said Wednesday they would postpone after Chairman Tom Wheeler allegedly refused to testify.  ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT “This fight continues as the future of the Internet is at stake,” House oversight committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., vowed, in a statement announcing the hearing delay.  For now, the plan is in the FCC’s hands.  At issue is a proposal that proponents say would ensure an “open” Internet, by growing the government’s power to oversee Internet service providers and establish new rules to bar companies from blocking or slowing data.  But The Hill reports that a vital Democratic member, Mignon Clyburn, is now seeking last-minute changes to scale back Wheeler’s proposal.  This puts Wheeler in a tough spot because the FCC is composed of three Democrats and two Republicans. The Republicans are likely to oppose the plan, and Wheeler would need Clyburn on board to push it through.  According to The Hill, Clyburn would leave alone the most controversial plank of the proposal — a call to regulate broadband Internet as a telecommunications service, treating it much like telephones.  But she reportedly wants to strip a new legal category that would give the FCC additional legal authority over certain deals over back-end Internet traffic.  Her requests may be in the weeds, but they have the effect of potentially complicating Thursday’s vote. The two Republican members, Ajit Pai and Mike O’Rielly, earlier this week already urged Wheeler to postpone that vote — and to release the plan so the public can review it. Wheeler so far has not agreed to...

Read More